WOMEN'S SWIMMING AND DIVING

Early Origins of Women's Swimming:
UC had a women's swimming team as far backstroke as the 1920's, but it didn't become an official varsity sport until the early 70's. Formal competition began in 1923 after the formation of the Women's Athletic Association Council. This group sponsored inter-class, inter-sorority and non-sorority tournaments, offering a cup to the winner of each. There was also competition with local high school and YMCA teams, with a few intercollegiate meets as well. The roster has always been filled with impressive swimmers, even though scholarships weren't offered until 1979. Yet, even before the team was officially recognized, they made a name for themselves. Everyone took notice of Cincinnati team when, Representing United States of America, UC swimmer Alice Jones set a new World Record in the 100 butterfly in a time of 1:04.1 on August 20, 1970. Two days later, Jones set another World Record, this time in the 200 butterfly in 2:19.3. Jones held the record in the 100 butterfly until July 21, 1972, and the record in the 200 butterfly until August 7, 1971.

1971-72
Under the tutelage of Alan Begbie, the first ever official women's swim team showed dominance as they captured first place in the All-Ohio State Meet. Although upset at the Midwest Regional Swim Meet by Bowling Green University, UC posted victories in the 100, 200 and 400 freestyle by Heidi Lipe, the 50 freestyle by Jacki Hirsty, and the 100 breaststroke by Donna Yoemans. The 200 and 400 Relay teams also finished first. Hosting the third annual Women's National Intercollegiate Swimming and Diving Championships in Laurence Pool, the "Bearkittens" swam their way to a surprising third place finish, winning more events than any other team. Cincinnati swept all four freestyle races, and took the 400 and 200 relays, as well as the 100 and 400 IM's. Alice Jones time in the 400 IM was a new meet record.

1972-73
Now under the guidance of Tom Williams, the women recorded another impressive season. Debbie Kibler became the first women ever to be named an Athlete of the Week at UC. She was named such following her four gold medals at the International Invitational Swimming Meet at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. Again placing third as a team in the National Meet, Kibler took seventh place in the 50 backstroke, and 11th in the 100 breaststroke. Alice Jones placed 15th in the 200 IM, and took 4th in the 100 butterfly and 10th in the 100 breaststroke. Tina Lipe, Heidi Lipe, and Jeannie Foltz also qualified for the meet. Cincinnati set four records throughout the year, including the 100 and 200 breaststroke, as well as the 200-medley relay, and the 400 freestyle relay.

1973-74
Cincinnati took third place at the International Invitational Meet at the University of Waterloo. Jacki Hirsty and Debbie Kibler posted four victories each, with Alice Jones and Heidi Lipe posting three. Olympian Jenny Kemp won the 200 IM and the 50 backstroke at the Midwest Swimming and Diving Championships. Debbie Kibler won the 50 breaststroke, and the Bearkittens won the 400-medley relay. At the end of the meet, UC swimmers set three new meet records. The first Annual Ohio Association for Intercollegiate Sports for Women (OAISW) Meet was held in Laurence pool with Cincinnati taking third place. Kemp received special recognition for her forth place finish in the 100 backstroke and fifth place finish in the 100 freestyle in the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) National Meet. Heidi Lipe finished 12th in the 400 freestyle, and Debbie Kibler finished 12th in the 50 breaststroke.

1974-75
Claiming first place at both the UC Invitational and the Bearcat Invitational, the Bearkittens recorded another strong year under new Head Coach Harry Gottschang. The UC women swam their way to a third place finish in the OAISW Meet, and an impressive 18th place at the Midwest Association for Intercollegiate Sports for Women (MAIAW), the regional championships of the National Meet.

1975-76
For the first time ever, UC held co-ed practices, allowing the women to receive the same nationally known guidance as the men's team, under coach Bob Groseth. They also hired the first female assistant coach in program history, Sue Krehnbrink, who functioned as the women's coach on road trips. The 15-member team posed a 4-2 record, and placed in the top ten in every tournament they entered, including a fifth place finish at the OAISW and a ninth place finish at the MAIAW. Kris Oddenwald broke the state record for the 500 freestyle race at the OAISW.

1976-77
UC placed third in the Bearcat Invitational, and seventh in the Terre Tarbell Invitational, in Indiana. The ladies also had a good showing at the state meet, placing seventh.

1977-78
Cincinnati placed fifth as a team in the OAISW Meet. Diver Jill Webster placed first in the 1-meter diver, setting a new pool record and qualifying for the National Meet on both springboards. She became the first female athlete in UC history to be named an All-American after her stellar performance, placing 14th in the 3-meter event.

1978-79
Diver Jill Webster received the Seiffert-Benning Award, making her the first woman athlete in UC history to receive a full-ride scholarship. The award, named after two fallen police officers, was given to an undergraduate woman athlete who exemplified outstanding qualities of leadership, sports etiquette, competitiveness, perseverance, and academic performance. Webster lived up to all those characteristics, repeating her All-American performance for a second consecutive year, placing 14th in the 3-meter event. In all, seven UC women qualified to the AIAW National Meet. Cincinnati placed forth in the State meet, posting four individual winners in four record times. Della Eveslage became the second female All-American, placing 13th on the 1-meter board. Kim Cull went undefeated in the dual meets, leading the Lady Bearcats to a 6-3 dual record.

1979-80
Jill Webster became an All-American for the third year, placing tenth on the 1-meter board, and eighth on the 3-meter, the highest place yet for a women in a national meet. Kim Cull held the record for every breaststroke event, placing tenth in the AIAW Meet. Della Eveslage placed first in both diving events at the OAISW, and went on to place third in the US Indoor Diving Championships. In all, five Lady Bearcats qualified to the national meet, setting seven state records and 19 school records.

1980-81
In the most challenging season to date, and under new Head Coach Frank Busch, the Lady Bearcats went 4-4, placing second at the OAISW State Meet, and qualifying nine to the AIAW. As a team, UC placed 19th in the National Meet, setting 21 new school records in the process. Jill Webster was became a four-time All-American placing third on the 1-meter board, bettering her previous performance of eighth for the best in school history. She also made the eight-member National Platform Diving team. Kim Cull was also named All-American for her ninth place finish in the 50-breaststroke. She also placed sixteenth in the 100-breaststroke event. The 200-medley relay team of Yeaworth, Richetto, Wiedmann and Call were also All-Americans, placing 10th. Webster received the Helen Norman Smith Award honoring a senior female student-athlete who has made the greatest scholastic leadership and athletic contribution to UC.

1981-82
The Lady Bearcats went undefeated in dual meets, posting a 5-0 record, and placing fourth in the National Independent Championships (the Metro Conference did not hold championships in Swimming). Tina Gustafsson won the 200-freestyle race, while Della Eveslage placed first in the 1-meter diving event. UC sent four individuals and one relay team to the first annual Women's NCAA National Meet. Eveslage (third, 1-meter tying a school record for the highest a women has placed in a national meet thus far; eighth 3-meter), Eva Lundahl (11th, 50 backstroke) and Gustafsson (third, 200-freestyle; 10th, 200-backstroke; 11th, 100-freestyle) were named All-Americans for their effort. Gustafsson's national meet times were all new school records. She swam for her home country, Sweden, in the 1980 Olympics.

1982-83
Cincinnati placed third in the National Independent Meet, Sending two individuals and two relay teams to the NCAA. Lori Strong finished 14th in the 1650, missing All-American by two positions. Lori Armruster placed 31st in the 100 IM. The relay teams had success, placing in the top 25 in both the 200 and 400 freestyle races.

1983-84
The Lady Bearcats recorded a 7-4 dual record on the season, three of the four losses coming to nationally ranked teams. They also record the first win over powerhouse, Indiana, 89-51. The women placed third in the Metro Conference Championships, and fourth in the National Independent. Theresa Brossart finished first in the 100 freestyle and set a new school record, finishing second in the 50 freestyle. She also placed third in the 200 freestyle, qualifing to the NCAA. Lori Strong set a new school record in the 200 butterfly, where she finished fourth. She placed third in the 500 freestyle, second in the 400 IM, and first in the 1650 freestyle. Strong also qualified to the National Meet. Nathalie Recskie won both breaststroke events, with Patti Shanahan placing third in the 100.

1984-85
Going undefeated in dual meets and placing second in the Metro Championship Meet, the Lady Bearcats qualified 12 to the NCAA National Meet, and set nine new school records. Caroline Cooper set eight of those records on her own, recording the best time in the nation in the 100-butterfly (54.43), and was named Metro Swimmer of the Year after qualifying to the finals for seven different events. Cooper was named an All-American after placing third in the 50 freestyle and fifth in the 100 freestyle. She also placed in the top 30 in the 200 freestyle. Theresa Brossart placed 13th in the 50 freestyle and 18th in the 100 freestyle, while Lori Strong finished 31st in the 1650 freestyle. The relay team of Jean Barschow, Lowis Brafield, Catherine Lixweiler, and Patti Shanahan placed in the top 20 in the 400 medley, and the 200, 400, and 800 freestyle races. They came in 23rd in the 200-medley relay. Jill Schlabach finished 21st on the 1-meter diving board, and Lisa Terfzger and Karen Thompson both placed in the top 20 on the 3-meter board, while Schlabach placed 12th. Overall, Cincinnati placed 20th in the NCAA.

1985-86
Helene Bjornstad and Jill Schlabach were named All-Americans after their impressive performances at the NCAA National Meet. Bjornstad placed forth in the 100 breaststroke, and fifth in the 200 breaststroke. Schlabach finished seventh on the 1-meter board. She was also named Metro Diver of the Year after winning the 1-meter event. As a team, UC placed 13th in the nation, and second in the Metro. Caroline Cooper was named Metro Swimmer of the Year, and received Honorable Mention All-American honors for her 15th place finish in the 100 butterfly. Theresa Brossart received the Helen Smith Award after her stellar performance as a Bearcat. She topped off her career an 11th place finish in the 50 freestyle at the NCAA, earning her Honorable Mention All-American. Dana Born was named Academic All-American, leading the team to the highest GPA at UC.

1986-87
The Lady Bearcats recorded a 7-2 dual season record, and won the Metro Conference Championships in style, going on to place 25th in the NCAA. Caroline Cooper was named Metro Swimmer of the Year after her first place finishes in the 50 and 100 freestyle races. Her times set new Metro records, and her 23.12 time in the 50 became a new school record as well. She continued her strong effort, placing third in the 100 butterfly at the NCAA Championships, earning herself All-American honors. Michelle MacPhereson also set new Metro and school records in her championship performances in the 200 butterfly, 200 IM and 400 IM. She earned All-American Honorable Mention at the NCAA placing 15th in the 400 IM. The 400 and 800 freestyle relay teams set new Metro records as well, posting a new UC mark in the 800. In all, 10 school records were set, and four women qualified to nationals, placing in the top 25 in all 14 events.

1987-88
Cincinnati posted an undefeated 8-0 dual mark, and placed second in the Metro Conference Championships. Qualifying eight to the National Championships, the Lady Bearcats set 13 new school records. Nine team members earned Honorable Mention All-American Honors, with the entire team placing in the top 20 in their events. Caroline Cooper was named an All-American for her sixth place finish in the 50 freestyle (22.98). Jill Schlabach participated in the first ever platform diving exhibition at the NCAA meet, placing 11th in both that and the 1-meter event. She set a new conference and school record in the 3-meter board at the Metro, as did Michelle MacPhereson (in her 400 and 200 IM victories), and Fiona McLay (in the 500 freestyle). The 200 and 400 freestyle relay teams also set new records as they won their events.

1988-89
The loss of key seniors hurt the depth of the team, but UC still placed third in the Metro, and second in the All-Ohio Invitational. Placing 36th overall at the NCAA, the Lady Bearcats were led by Michelle MacPhereson, the Canadian bronze medallist in the 1984 Olympic Games. MacPhereson earned Honorable Mention All-American honors after her 13th place finish in the 400IM. She also placed in the top 20 in the 200 IM.

1989-90
Former UC standout Monty Hopkins replaced Frank Busch as Head Coach. Busch posted an impressive 76-17 record during his time as coach of the Women's team at Cincinnati. The Lady Bearcats posted a 5-3 dual record and placed fourth in the Metro Championships. Diane Kelly earned All-American Honors after placing eighth on the 1-meter board. In all, five women qualified to the National Tournament.

1990-91
The Lady Bearcats placed third in the All-Ohio, and second in the Wheaton Invitational. Allyson Heger qualified for the NCAA Regional Diving Meet, placing eighth on the 3-meter and 11th on the 1-meter.

1991-92
Lori Rizzuto was named the National Independent Conference Diver of the Year after the women placed first overall in the Championship Meet. She went on to earn All-American honors following her fifth place finish on the 3-meter board at the NCAA National Meet. Monty Hopkins and Charlie Casuto were named the NIC Coaches of the Year. In all, two individuals, and two relay teams met the new NCAA stringent time standards

1992-93
Cincinnati placed forth in the National Independent Championships. Allyson Heger was named NIC Female Diver of the Year for her first place finish on the1-meter board, and second place on the 3-meter. Debbie Shotwell won the 1650 freestyle, and placed second in the 500 and 200 freestyle races. Beth Pheasant finished first in the50 freestyle in a time of 23.74.

1993-94
The Lady Bearcats recorded a winning dual record, and placed third in the Eastern Intercollegiate Conference Championships. Jennifer McLeod was named first alternate for the NCAA National Meet in the 1650 after winning the 500 and 1650 freestyle races setting new conference records in each. She was named EIC Swimmer of the Year for her efforts. Veronika Svensson won the 200 butterfly and the 400 IM, while Allyson Heger placed second in the 1-meter and third in the 3-meter diving events. Katie Godby won both events, earning EIC Diver of the Year honors.

1994-95
Katie Godby was named EIC Diver of the Year for the second consecutive season following her first place finishes in both the 1-meter and 3-meter events. UC placed third overall, posting two individual victories and one relay win. Jennifer McLeod was ranked 35th in the world in the 1500 freestyle, and recorded all-time best times in the 500, 100, and 1650 freestyle events.

1995-96
Becky Ruehl became the first-ever female National Champion in any sport at UC when she won the Platform Diving event at the NCAA National Meet. She also placed second on both the 1-meter and 3-meter boards, earning herself All-American Honors, and the prestigious NCAA Diver of the Year Award. Ruehl also made the 1996 Olympic team, placing fourth for the United States in Atlanta. Fellow diver Angie Trostel also earned All-American Honors finishing fifth on the platform, and 10th in both the 1-meter and 3-meter events. The Bearcats took 16th place overall in the NCAA Championships. Jennifer McLeod was named the National Conference Outstanding Swimmer of the Year after winning the 500 and 1650 freestyle races, and placing second in the 200 freestyle event at the NIC Championships. UC garnered four other individual victories on their way to second place.

1996-97
The Lady Bearcats won the National Invitational Championships with 15 individual and relay victories. Angie Trostel and Becky Ruehl again represented UC at the NCAA Championships, with Trostel placing fourth on the 3-meter board and seventh on the 1-meter board, capturing All-American Honors for the second consecutive year. Ruehl placed 10th on the 3-meter board, earning Honorable Mention All-American and Academic All-American, but was unable to defend her Platform title due to an injury.

1997-98
Placing first in the NIC for a second year, UC boasted 11 different athletes who claimed victories. Cosmo Saunders, Barbi Brochu and Sofia Svensson were all double winners for the Bearcats, with Svensson capturing Rookie of the Year honors. Angie Trostel and Becky Ruehl both qualified for the NCAA meet after an impressive performance at the qualifier. Trostel earned Honorable Mention All-American honors for her ninth place finish on the 1-meter and 10th place finish on the 3-meter. Ruehl earned the same for finishing 16th on the 3-meter.

1998-99
Angie Trostel was named NIC Diver of the Year after her sweep of the springboard events at the conference championships. She again earned All-American honors after placing seventh on the 3-meter board. She also did well in the 1-meter event, placing 11th. Shannon Strini placed first in the 50 and 100 freestyle events in the NIC, qualifying for the NCAA. She placed in the top 45 in the nation in the 50 freestyle with a time of: 23.52. Maria Oberg made a splash in her collegiate debut, winning three individual events in the triangular meet. She also won the 500 and 1650 freestyle events at the NIC. Cincinnati swept all five relays, winning the NIC Championships for a third year in a row.

1999-2000
Sofia Svensson and Nelly Jorgensen both set new NIC records in their events, leading UC to a fourth consecutive NIC Championship. Svensson captured first in the 200 butterfly, and then set the NIC record in the 200 backstroke. Jorgensen's record was in the 200 freestyle. Svensson qualified to the NCAA, placing 28th in the 200 IM and 33rd in the 200 butterfly. Jorgensen, also participating in the National Meet, placed 16th in the 200-freestyle. Becky Ruehl placed ninth in the platform diving event.

2000-01
Finishing first in the NIC Championships for an unprecedented fifth year, the Bearcats were led by Maria Oberg. Oberg qualified for the NCAA National Meet automatically by meeting their "A" time standard. Setting a new school record to do so, she won the 500 freestyle at the NIC in a time of 4:42.73. She went on to place in the top 20 in all three of her events, including her seventh place finish in the 500, earning her All-American honors.

2001-02
Traveling to the first ever Conference USA Championship Meet, the Bearcats showed their dominance, placing first. Coach Monty Hopkins received the inaugural Coach of the Year Award. The 200 medley relay team broke the record set in1987, placing first in a time of 1:45.53. Marein de Jong and Maria Oberg were triple winners, both qualifying the NCAA National Meet. de Jong placed in the top 25 in the nation for the 500 freestyle, and in the top 40 in both the 100 freestyle and 100 butterfly. Oberg repeated her All-American performance, placing fifth in the 500 freestyle race, setting a new school record in the process with a time of 4:42.77. She was named the C-USA Swimmer of the Meet, Swimmer of the Year, and Verizon Academic All-District At-Large.

2002-03
Cincinnati placed second at the Conference USA Meet. Ann Degenstein was named conference Freshman Swimmer of the Year after she won both the 500 freestyle and 200 butterfly events, setting a new meet record in the latter (2:01.50). Emma Gustafsson was also a double winner, victorious in both the 100 and 200 breaststroke races, setting a new conference record in a time of 2:16.30 in the 200. Both women met the NCAA consideration times. Shauna Conrad also met these stringent time considerations, placing first in the C-USA 1650 freestyle race in a time of 16:56.49.


MEN'S SWIMMING AND DIVING

1912-13
Swimming was inaugurated as a varsity sport when a student, N.M. Lyons, sent an application into the Athletic Council for the non-existent position of swim team manager. The Council was intrigued, and gave him the position forming the first swim team. The completion of a new gymnasium provided a swimming pool which measured 25 by 60 feet. , a call for swimmers produced "about 30 good, fast men" according to the UC Yearbook. The first meet took place on Dec. 11, 1912, an interclass meet won handily by the Freshmen. Two state records were broken in this meet. On Dec. 21, a meet vs. the Cincinnati Gymnasium and Athletic Club became UC's first outside competition in the sport. Olympian Joe Morris made the team a hit, bringing as many as 400 spectators to the first meet. He set many new state records, but was not technically allowed to compete on varsity due to his freshman status. The Cincinnati Enquirer sums up the first intercollegiate meet against Cornell University by saying, "the meet was the most successful held in this city and also marked the first appearance of an Eastern College team at the University." For the finale of the first season, a meet was scheduled vs. Yale and an all-Cincinnati team composed of the best swimmers in the city and the state. The event, which attracted a big buildup, never went off as heavy rains and flooding kept Yale from reaching the Queen City.

1913-14
An interclass meet was held in late December, won by the Sophomores. The first intercollegiate meet took place on March 28, 1914. The Bearcats defeated a highly-touted Cornell team, 31-22, behind the exploits of Joe Morris, who won the 20, 50, 100 and 220-yard swim events. Two weeks later the Bearcats lost to Princeton, 30-15.

1915-16
Dr. Williams is listed as the coach. Although their star, Joe Morris, was no longer on the team due to graduation UC still recorded a good season, beating the North Cincinnati Turnverein team.

1920-21
Following a five-year hiatus, the swim team reformed. Although they lost every meet, Cincinnati swimmers gained valuable experience.

1923-24
After another lull, the team restructured under the guidance of Coach G.W. McLaren. Nicknamed the "fish-men," the Bearcats made a very good showing for a new team. Erwin Wolfson set a new record in the "plunge for distance", finishing the 60' length of the pool in 34 3/4 seconds. Jimmy Nippert also participated in the plunge. Bill Ross broke Joe Morris' record in the 40-yard swim, lowering it by 4/5 of a second. UC beat the Cincinnati Gym Association team in the formal meet.

1924-25
Under the guidance of coach G. W. McLauren, The Cincinnati swimmers broke four records in the first meet of the season. Dolwebber broke the record in the 100-yard swim, winning the race. The relay team also knocked the former mark down by four seconds. A team representing the Bearcats competed in the AAU Meet, with the relay team finishing second to the world champion YMCA team. Art Fennekohl finished first in the 220, and was named the junior champion of the Ohio chapter of the AAU. Dolwebber placed second in the 220, and Gally finished second in the 150 backstroke.

1925-26
The Bearcats captured the Buckeye Athletic Association (BAA) Ohio Swimming Title in style, taking first and second place in all but two events. Captain Arthur Fennekohl led UC to a 5-0 record, placing first in at least two events during every meet. He also was a member of the undefeated relay team.

1926-27
The Bearcats again swam their way to a tremendous victory during the BAA Swimming Championships. Not one UC swimmer was passed during the meet, allowing Cincinnati to take both first and second place in each event, while breaking five conference records. Richard Cragg also recorded a win in the "fancy diving" event.

1927-28
The Bearcats continued their dominant style under the tutelage of coach George Babcock. The squad earned a record of 5-1 on the season, defeating the powerful team from the College of Wooster twice.

1928-29
Two UC swimmers qualified to the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Swimming Championships for the first time. Aheburn placed fifth in the qualifying heat for the 150-yard backstroke, and Welsh placed sixth in the fancy diving qualifying round.

1929-30
The Bearcats posted a 3-2 record on the season. One of their losses was actually a 31-31 tie with the University of Pittsburgh, but was ruled a loss because the rules did not allow for ties. The win was given to Pittsburgh, the home team.

1930-31
Lack of funds caused the Athletic Department to cancel the entire schedule.

1931-32
Following a change in the rulebook allowing ties, the Bearcats ended the regular season with a 5-1-1 record. Leading the team was Charles Salie, who broke both DePauw University and Wittenberg University's pool records during the season, and qualified for the Ninth Annual NCAA Championship Meet. Salie placed fourth in the 150-yard backstroke.

1932-33
Under the guidance of Coach Woodworth, Roger Fosdick began his swimming career at UC as the most consistent point maker on the team. Fosdick finished first with 49 total points. Albert Hamm came in second with nine. The Bearcats posted a 4-1 record on the season, downing powerhouse Wittenberg, twice.

1933-34
John Schneider broke a pool record at Fenn College during the Ohio Intercollegiate Conference (OIC) Championship Meet in the 100-yard freestyle, and the relay team placed third, securing a second place team finish. Roger Fosdick continued to lead the team, scoring the most points in every meet.

1934-35
The Cincinnati swimmers hired Fred "Tiny" Pfeiffer to take over at the helm. Pfeiffer would remain Head Coach of the Bearcats for the next 25 years.

1935-36
UC defeated Wittenberg, Wayne College, and Ohio Wesleyan.

1936-37
Cincinnati won the Buckeye Swimming Meet held at UC. The dominant pair of divers in Castelli and Perry Ritchie posted at least one top-three finish in each meet, helping the Bearcats secure a winning record.

1937-38
UC went 1-6 on the season in dual meets beating Ohio University. Freshman diver John Popov was victorious in every meet he entered.

1938-39
Cincinnati went 1-6 on the season after losing a powerful senior class to graduation. Diver Perry Ritchie was impressive, finishing in the top-three at every event. A team representing the Bearcats competed in the district AAU Meet, finishing first.

1939-40
Relying on the talent of the new influx of sophomores, the Bearcats posted a 6-2 record on the season, beating Ohio University twice. Again, members of the team competed in the district AAU Meet, but do to a rule change, they were no longer able to represent the University.

1940-41
Standout John Popov dove in every scheduled meet all four years of his college career, and finished his senior season totally undefeated.

1941-42
The Bearcats, continuing to build strength and depth, sent three swimmers to the NCAA Championships. Roy Lagaly finished in the top-10 in the 440-yard freestyle, 200-yard freestyle, and the 100-yard freestyle, while Bob Mitchel finished 10th in the 440-yard freestyle, and Charles Keating finished sixth in the 200-yard breaststroke. Bill Graber went undefeated in the backstroke during regular season meets.

1942-43
Cincinnati went 6-1 on the season, downing powerhouses such as Wittenberg University and Indiana University on their way to their strongest finish as a team in four years.

1943-44
No information.

1944-45
Posting a 1-2 dual record, Charlie Keating finished first in the 200 breaststroke and fifth in the 50 freestyle at the Conference Meet. Roy Lagaly finished fourth in the 1500 freestyle.

1945-46
Future UC Hall-of-Famer, Charles Keating won the 1946 NCAA Championship Meet in the 200-yard butterfly, finishing with a time of 2:26.2. Keating, along with teammate Roy Lagaly, who placed forth in the 1500 freestyle, captured All-American honors, the first such honors in Cincinnati history. The Bearcats finished eighth in the team standings.

1946-47
Twelve new pool and sectional records were set following a 9-1 dual record. Bill Keating won the AAU championships.

1947-48
Competing in the Central Collegiate Conference (CCC) Championships, Charles Keating, second in the 200 breaststroke, and Roy Lagaly, third in the 440 freestyle, boosted the team to a second place finished. The relay team came in second in both the 300-yard and 400-yard freestyle relays. The Bearcats were 4-2 on the season.

1948-49
Beating Bowling Green University, the University of Louisville, and Ohio University on their way to a 5-3 record, the Bearcats placed third in the CCC Conference Championships. The relay teams placed second in the 300 medley, and forth in the 400 freestyle relays. Bill Keating, brother of former UC star Charles Keating, placed forth in the 200 breaststroke. He was also a member of the relay team. Sending representatives to the NCAA Championship Meet, Cincinnati tied for 16th place overall. Roy Stickney was named an All-American for his forth place performance in the 150 IM.

1949-50
Beginning a period of growth that would last most of the decade, UC went 2-5 on the season, smashing Louisville 51-33. Although recording a loss against Bowling Green University 44-31, Roy Stickney broke two pool records for Cincinnati in that meet. The Bearcats placed fourth in the CCC Championships. Stickney represented UC in the NCAA National Meet, and was named All-American for the second consecutive year.

1950-51
The Bearcats went 1-5 on the season, bettering the University of Kentucky 46-29 in their dual meet, and narrowly losing 38-37 to Ohio University three weeks later.

1951-52
UC went 2-6 on the season, posting wins over Louisville, 48-36, and the University of Kentucky, 44-41.

1952-53
The first four meets of the season were cancelled due to a lack of manpower. There were only seven swimmers on the roster, with only one person competing in the breaststroke, and no one in the backstroke. The Bearcats however were determined not to let the lack of people ruin their season. Gaining respect and experience against Kent State and Bowling Green University, UC competed in the last four meets. This was the first year for Cincinnati in the Mid-American Conference, but the Bearcats did not send a team to the Championship Meet.

1953-56
Shortage of personnel hurt UC. Struggling to gain depth, Cincinnati recorded an 0-21 cumulative record over the next three seasons. Now a member of the newly formed Mid-American Conference, the swim team competed against Miami University (OH), Berea College (KY) and Xavier University for the first time.

1956-57
Tying their first outing of the year, UC beat Eastern Kentucky University in the second meet of the season for their first win in four years. The Bearcats also downed conference foe Berea College 68-34 two weeks later. Cincinnati had an overall record of 2-4-2 on the season.

1957-58
Finishing the season with a 6-1 record, and finally obtaining the manpower they desired, UC began a period of dominance that would continue for a decade. Competing for the first time in the reinstated Missouri Valley Conference (MVC), the Bearcats captured a first place finish in the Conference Meet. UC had at least one finish in the top-three in every event, including two record-setting wins by Bob De Brunner in the 100 and 200 backstroke. Bill Britton finished first in the 50 and 100 freestyle events. The relay team also recorded a first place finish.

1958-59
Bill Britton again recorded first place finishes in the MVC Conference Championships, capturing victories in the 50 and 100 freestyle races. Bob De Brunner defended his title in the 100 backstroke. Dave Musselman broke De Brunner's year-old record in the 200 backstroke to capture first. De Brunner finished a close second. Milt Melman placed first in the 1-meter diving event, and the relay team won the 400 freestyle, breaking the tie against Louisville to clinch the team championship for the second consecutive year.

1959-60
Coach "Tiny" Pfeiffer retired at the end of the `59 season, handing the reins over to Paul Hartlaub. The Bearcat dominance in the MVC continued under this new leader, as UC took first in the MVC Conference Meet for a third consecutive year. Keith Dimond set new records in the 100 butterfly, the 200 IM, and the 200 backstroke. Don Rau set a new record in the 100 and 200 breaststroke, and the relay team of De Brunner, Rau, Mark Gates, and Bob Roe set a new record in the 400 Medley. Cincinnati captured 10 first places in 15 events, setting six conference records and one school record in the process. Keith Dimond was the only triple winner of the meet.

1960-61
The Bearcats finished an impressive season with a 10-4 record, the winningest season ever in Cincinnati history thus far. Posting yet another victory in the MVC Conference Meet, UC sent Gary Heinrich and James Marchetti to the NCAA National Meet. Awarded All-American honors, Heinrich took three medals in the meet, placing second in the 200 butterfly, third in the 1500 freestyle, and forth in the 440 freestyle. All six finalists in the 440 surpassed the former NCAA record.

1961-62
Recording an 8-1 record, and winning the MVC Conference Meet, the Bearcats set 12 new school records and 14 new conference records on their way to a seventh place finish in the NCAA National Meet, the best finish in Bearcat history. Gary Heinrich took two-second place finished in the 1500 and 440 freestyle. Jim Norman placed third in the 50 freestyle, and fifth in the 100 freestyle. Joe Alkire placed forth in the 100 butterfly. Alkire, Heinrich, Norman, along with relay team members Jim Marchetti and Gerry Sapadin acquired All-American honors for their accomplishments. (Unfortunately the celebration was cut short when Jim Marchetti and Jim Norman were killed in a car accident while vacationing in California on April 21, 1962.)

1962-63
Gary Heinrich became an All-American for the third straight year as he placed fifth in the 1650 freestyle and teammate Phil Meng placed seventh in the 50 freestyle. UC tied for 18th overall in the NCAA Championship Meet. The Bearcats went 5-2 on the season, and continued their dominance of the MVC placing first in the Conference Meet. Heinrich finished his career by placing in the top-five in every event he swam in the NCAA Meet.

1963-64
The Bearcats ruled the MVC recording another Conference Meet victory. Fred Terands set a new conference record in the 220 freestyle with a time of 1:54.3. Cleon Wingard set a record in both the 1650 and 500 freestyle races, and Phil Meng set a new record in the 50 freestyle. Bob Farr captured first place in 1-meter diving event, and the relay team won the 400 medley. After all was said and done, five different swimmers won two events each, setting five new conference records in the process. Coach Paul Hartlaub left the Bearcats with an all time record of 33-15.

1964-65
Former UC All-American, Roy Lagaly took over as Head Coach. Under his tutelage, the Bearcats won the MVC for the eighth consecutive year, lead by the only triple winner of the meet, Rudy Boerio. Jack Zakim garnered All-American honors after placing 11th in the 200 backstroke and 10th in the 100 backstroke, leading Cincinnati to a 26th place finish in the NCAA Championship Meet. Zakim also set new conference records in those events.

1965-66
The Bearcats went 8-3 on the season, and placed first the MVC. Following the Conference Meet, Cincinnati swimmers held all 15 records, and five swimmers qualified to nationals. Jack Zakim finished 19th in the 200 backstroke, and 21st in the 100 backstroke. The relay team finished 18th in the 400 medley.

1966-67
Represented by six double winners, UC set five conference records and four school records on their way to another MVC Conference Meet victory. Denny Matyko set the new MVC record in the 500 freestyle with a time of 5:11.4. Jack Zakim beat his own record in the 100 backstroke, lowering it to 55.2 seconds, qualifying to the National Meet. The Bearcats also captured new records in both the 400 and 800 freestyle relay events.

1967-68
UC posted a record of 10-5, tying the 1960 record for the most dual wins in a season. The win over Miami University (OH), was the first loss the Redskins suffered in two years. Denny Matyko set two new school records, breaking the 500 freestyle record, twice. Rick Morrison also set a new school and conference record, breaking the 200 breaststroke twice during the year, lowering it to a time of 2:22.4. In all, six new conference records were set, as the Bearcats won the MVC, more than doubling the points scored by any other team.

1968-69
Triple winner Denny Scheidt led UC to another victory of the MVC Conference Meet. Cincinnati set nine new MVC records and 10 school records, winning 17 of 18 events.

1969-70
Again MVC Champions, the Bearcats went 7-7 on the season. Star divers, Glenn Bitzenhofer, the winner of both the 1-meter and 3-meter MVC events, and Vince Napoli, second place in both events, qualified to the NCAA National Meet, and Rich Goff, finished in the top-20 at the NCAA in both the 100 and 200 butterfly.

1970-71
Winning every MVC Meet ever held, UC, now independent, hosted the first annual Invitational of Independent Universities, winning the meet. Rich Goff again qualified to the NCAA Nationals, placing in the top-20 for the 100 butterfly, and the top-25 in the 200 butterfly. In the process he set a new school record for the 100. Ed Pyle placed in the NCAA top-20 for the 400 IM, also setting a new school record. Divers Glenn Bitenhofer and Tim McLaughlin both placed in the top-50 for the 1-meter dive.

1971-72
UC won the Cincinnati Independent Invitational for the second time, setting eight new records, and qualifying three divers and one swimmer to the NCAA National Meet. Glenn Bitzenhofer placed in the top-40 for the 1-meter event, and the top-50 for the 3-meter dive. Jim Pettigrew placed in the top-35 in the 1-meter. Steve Pyle finished in the top-55 for both the 200 and 500 freestyle races. Rich Goff received the annual Jimmy Nippert Award.

1972-73
The Bearcats posted a 9-4 record on the season, and won the Independent Championships, now held at Western Illinois University, for the third consecutive year. The team broke six school records, and six team members qualified to the NCAA National Meet. Divers Tim McLaughlin and Jim Pettigrew finished in the top-50 for the 1-meter event, with Pettigrew finishing in the top-50 for the 3-meter as well. Gerry Schroder placed in the top-50 in the 100 breaststroke, and Russ Ratterman placed in the top-45 in the 400 IM. Bill Keating Jr., son of Bill Keating Sr., the former UC letter winner, placed in the top-40 in the 1650 freestyle.

1973-74
Gerry Schroder won the 100 breaststroke at the Midwest Collegiate Swimming Championship, in record time ensuring his spot in the NCAA National Meet. Andy Christensen and diver Tim McLaughlin also qualified. Two other records were set during the year, including the 800 freestyle relay, and a new 1000 freestyle record was set by Bill Keating in a time of 10:08.0. Coach Roy Lagaly retired at the end of this season, ending his very successful career with a 70-50 all time record.

1974-75
Taking Lagaly's place was nationally recognized coach Bob Groseth. Under his guidance, UC recorded the best season in 12 years. The Bearcats set four new records at the Midwest Independent School Invitational Meet. Five swimmers and three divers qualified to the NCAA National Meet, where Jay Spencer and Bob Kloos both swam to new personal bests.

1975-76
Posting a 5-3 record on the season, and a fourth place finish at the Independent National Collegiate Swimming and Diving Championships, the Bearcats qualified nine individuals and three relay teams to the NCAA National Meet. Scoring for the first time since 1965, the team tied for 26th place.

1976-77
Jay Spencer broke a 15-year-old school record, the longest standing record in history, when he finished the 50-freestyle in a time of 21.7. The old record, held by Jim Norman in 1962, was one tenth of a second slower. The Bearcats placed first in the Midwest Independent Universities Invitational for a fourth consecutive year. Cincinnati won 15 of 18 events and set five new school records in the process. Bill Miller placed 44th in the 100-breaststroke at Nationals, and the 800 freestyle relay team placed 16th in the NCAA Championships with a time of 6:46.42.

1977-78
Bob Ritter won the 500 freestyle and the 1650 freestyle at the National Independent Championships, the team finished second. Bob Kloos finished fourth in the 500, Monty Hopkins finished sixth, and Ed Bachman finished eighth. Seven Bearcats qualified to the NCAA National Meet. Bob Ritter was named an All-American for his sixth place finish in the 1650 freestyle in a time of 15:18.68. His teammate, Ed Buchman, placed 20th. Ed Goodman finished 25th in both the 1-meter and 3-meter diving events. Hopkins was the recipient of the prestigious Jimmy Nippert Award.

1978-79
Terry Carlisle took over as Head Coach. Nicknamed the "Bearfish," Cincinnati placed second at the Metro Conference Championships, qualifying five to the NCAA National Meet. Jurgon Worth won three Metro events, setting a new school record in the 200 butterfly. Bob Ritter won the 200, 500 and 1650 freestyle races, setting new records in all three. He was unanimously voted the Outstanding Performer for the Metro Conference. In all, nine new school records were set.

1979-80
Posting a 5-6 dual record, UC placed third in the Metro Conference Championships. Jurgon Worth placed second in the 200 butterfly, and first in both the 200 and 400 IM, the latter with a meet record time. Bob Ritter won both the 500 and 1650 freestyle races, and placed second in the 200 freestyle.

1980-81
Frank Busch took over at the helm to lead the Bearcats to a fourth place finish in the National Independent Collegiate Championship, setting eight school records. Haakon Stokke qualified for the NCAA and set two new Norwegian records. Jurgen Wurth finished sixth at the US Nationals in the 200-butterfly.

1981-82
Pelle Wikstrom finished fourth in the 200 freestyle in the NCAA National Meet to record the best finish at Nationals for a male in 20 years. He earned All-American honors for his effort. The team collaborated to finish 22nd at the NCAA (best finish since1961), fourth in the National Independent Championship, and set seven new school records.

1982-83
Cincinnati went 5-6 on the season, placing sixth at the National Independent Championships. Four new school records were set.

1983-84
In the best dual season since1974, the Bearcats posed an 8-3 record, all three losses coming to nationally ranked teams. UC finished third at the Metro Championships, and fifth in the National Independent Championships. Ulf Ornhjelm recorded three firsts during the conference meets, including the 200 freestyle, the 500 freestyle, and the 800 freestyle relay. Phil Sundahl finished first in the 1650 freestyle and fourth in the 500 freestyle and the 400 IM. Mark Backstroke finished in the top-four of all six events in which he participated. Cincinnati also signed Pat Evens, the youngest Olympic Trials Qualifier in Platform Diving ever.

1984-85
The Bearcats finished fourth in the Metro Conference Championships, posting 18 top-six finishes. Setting seven new records in the process, UC team members qualified to the NCAA in five events, placing 34th. Pat Evens made history as the only freshman diver to score points in the NCAA, placing 14th in the 1-meter, and 19th in the 3-meter. Rob McLean recorded six top-five conference finishes to qualify to Nationals, placing in the top-40 in the 400 IM. The 800-freestyle relay team finished 27th.

1985-86
Pat Evans was named Outstanding Male Diver of the Year after setting conference and school records in both the 1-meter and 3-meter events. He was named All-American at the NCAA National meet after placing third on the 3-meter board, and also placed in the top-25 on the 1-meter. Frank Busch was named Metro Coach of the Year, and Charlie Casuto was named Metro Diving Coach of the Year. Evens competed in the US National Meet, placing 12th on the 3-meter board. Lauren Hart set a new school record in the 100 backstroke in a time of 52.03, and teammate Phil Sundahl set a new record in the 200 backstroke (1:50.87).

1986-87
Cincinnati set eight new school records on their way to a 7-3 dual record and third place finish in the Metro Conference Championships. Qualifying three divers and one relay team to nations, UC placed 23rd overall. The 800 freestyle relay team finished 18th, and Pat Evans earned All-American honors as he placed third on both the 1-meter and 3-meter boards. O.J. Miller was named Academic All-American, and Ulf Ornhjelm earned the Jimmy Nippert Award.

1987-88
Placing third in the Metro Championships, UC qualified three to the NCAA, and set six new school records. Steve Bell won the 1-meter Metro event, placing in the top-25 at Nationals. He also participated in the exhibition platform event. Lauren Hart placed first in the 50 freestyle at the Metro, setting a new conference, school and pool record. He went on to place 22nd in the 50 freestyle at Nationals, and in the top-30 in the 100 backstroke. The 400 freestyle relay placed in the top-25, after Hart's record-setting first leg (44.47).

1988-89
After taking a year off to concentrate on the Olympic Trials, Pat Evens became the second University of Cincinnati National Champion with his outstanding performance on the 3-meter board at the NCAA National Meet. Setting a new NCAA, record of 649.55, Evens was named National Diver of the Year, as well as Metro Diver of the Year. He also took home All-American honors with second place finishes in the 1-meter and platform events. UC placed 18th overall as a team. Lauren Hart became an All-American with his eighth place finish in the 100 butterfly. The 1988 Olympic Trials qualifier placed in the top-25 in four other events. He received the Jimmy Nippert Award for his exceptional contributions while at UC. Charlie Casuto was named NCAA co-Diving Coach of the Year, and Metro Diving Coach of the Year for the second time in a row.

1989-90
Monty Hopkins, a former UC star took over as Head Coach. Busch, resigning to take a head coaching position in Arizona, posted an impressive 56-31 mark as the leader of the Bearcats. Taking third place in the Metro, UC qualified two divers to the NCAA Meet. Freshman Dean Panaro placed third on both the 1-meter and 3-meter boards to became an All-American. Steve Bell placed in the top-15 on the 1-meter, and the top-25 in the 3-meter.

1990-91
Cincinnati finished third in the All-Ohio and the Wheaton Inv. Scott Dill qualified for the Olympic Trials, and Brent Ellery set new school records in the 200 breaststroke, and the 400 IM.

1991-92
Head Coach Monty Hopkins and Diving Coach Charlie Casuto were named the National Independent Conference Coaches of the Year following the impressive first place finish at the NIC Championships. Brent Ellery was named the NIC Swimmer of the Year, and earned Honorable Mention All-American Honors at the NCAA Meet, placing 16th in the 400 IM, and in the top-25 in the 200 breaststroke. Andy Krendric, the NIC Diver of the Year, also earned Honorable Mention All-American by placing in the top-15 on both the 1-meter and 3-meter boards. He also was in the top-20 for platform. Brent Ponce was named Academic All-American. Two individuals and two relay teams met the new NCAA rigorous time standards.

1992-93
The Bearcats repeated as NIC Champions, leading the meet from the start. Eran Hirsch won the 500 freestyle and 200 butterfly, earning NIC Swimmer of the Year. Tim Hart placed first in the 100 butterfly with a time of 49.94, John Fagen won the 200 freestyle in a time of 1:39.54, and Craig Crawford was victorious in the 100-breaststroke (56.80).

1993-94
Cincinnati placed third in the Eastern Intercollegiate Conference Championships, with John Fagan, Tim Hart and the 800-freestyle relay team winning their events. Andy Kendrick made his second appearance in the NCAA Meet, earning three All-American Honors by placing sixth on the three meter, eighth on the platform, and 12th in the 1-meter diving events. Charlie Casuto was named EIC Diving Coach of the Year.

1994-95
Placing third overall in the Eastern Intercollegiates, UC recorded three individual victories and two relay wins. Andy Kendrick was named EIC Diver of the Year following his first place finish in the 1-meter, and second place finish in the 3-meter events. He qualified for the NCAA Meet for the third year in a row. Charlie Casuto was again named EIC Diving Coach of the Year. Tim Hart met the consideration times for the NCAA in both the 100 and 200 butterfly events.

1995-96
Posting an 8-8 record, the Bearcats placed second in the NIC's. Blake Layda was victorious in the 50 freestyle, while capturing top-five finishes in both the 100 backstroke and 100 freestyle. Eran Hirsch won the 100 butterfly, and finished fourth in the 200 butterfly. Aaron Lehr won the 1650 freestyle swim, and placed third in the 500. Jeppe Nielson posted top-five finishes in the 500, 200 and 100 freestyle races. Matt Dixon was second in both individual medleys.

1996-97
Finishing third in the NIC, Cincinnati posted eight individual and relay wins. Jeppe Nielsen was a double winner, victorious in both the 500 and 200 freestyle. Freshman Honza "Jan" Vitazka captured three school records, and won the 200 IM. Henrik Cleverdal finished first in the 200 butterfly, and was named to the GTE Academic All-American third team.

1997-98
The Bearcats were dominant, posting a 12-2 dual record, and finishing first in the NIC, winning 13 of 20 events. Jan Vitazka acquired All-American honors, placing fourth in the 200 IM, sixth in the 400 IM and16th in the 200 butterfly at the NCAA National Meet. Teammate Steven McLeod also earned an All-American award after placing seventh in the 1650 freestyle. Blake Layda, also qualifying for the NCAA, placed in the top-25 in the 50 freestyle, and the top-40 in the 100 freestyle. Cincinnati placed 23rd overall.

1998-99
Monty Hopkins and Charlie Casuto were both named Coach of the Year after UC placed first in the NIC. Kevin Dupuis won the Men's conference Swimmer of the Year award after becoming a triple winner in the meet. Three Bearcats qualified to the NCAA National Championships. Jan Vitazka became an All-American for the second straight year, placing sixth in the 200 IM. He also placed in the top-20 in both the 400 IM and the 200 butterfly. Dupuis was named Honorable Mention All-American after his 15th place finish in the 200 breaststroke. Steven McLeod placed 26th in the 1650 freestyle. UC was 27th overall.

1999-2000
Champions in the NIC for the third year, Cincinnati recorded a 7-2 regular season record. Kevin Dupuis won both the 200 breaststroke and the 400 IM, and Doug Zafft won the 100 butterfly and the 200 IM. Steven McLeod represented UC in the NCAA National Meet, placing in the top-20 in the 1500 freestyle, and the top-50 in the 400 freestyle. Ryan McNally, Scott Davison, Joe Seither and McLeod all qualified for the 2000 Olympic Trials. McNally posted the best Bearcat finish, placing in the top-45 in the Nation in the 100 butterfly. Former Bearcat stars Jan Vitazka of the Czech Republic, and Jeppe Neilsen of Denmark, competed for their respective countries in the 2000 Olympics. Vitazka swam the 100 butterfly, and the 200 and 400 individual medleys, while Neilsen was on the 800 freestyle relay team.

2000-01
Ryan McNally and Steve Davison both qualified for the National meet. McNally placed in the top-50 in the 50 freestyle, and finished in the top-20 for the 100 butterfly. Davison was 17th in the 1650.

2001-02
Cincinnati placed third in the first ever Conference USA Invitational. Ryan McNally and Scott Davison were both triple winners in the meet. McNally won both butterfly races and the 50 freestyle. Davison won the 500 and 1650 freestyles and the 400 IM. Both men qualified to the NCAA National Championships. McNally captured a new school record, placing 14th in the 100 butterfly in a time of 47.53. He also placed in the top-30 in both the 200 butterfly and the 50 freestyle.

2002-03
Scott Davison qualified for the NCAA National Meet for the third year in a row. Breaking a 10-year-old school record in the 500 freestyle race, posting a time of 4:24.82, Davison placed first in the C-USA Invitational. After winning the 1650 freestyle as well, he was named C-USA Swimmer of the Year. Davison went on to place 32nd at Nationals in the 500 (4:25.31), and 21st in the 1650 freestyle, in a time of 15:19.34. Ryan Yearwood set a C-USA meet record, winning the 100 freestyle, and the 400 freestyle relay team was also victorious. Overall, UC placed third in the meet.

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